“You can’t call this a life. We are humans, not donkeys.”

This series of time-stamped posts are from interviews conducted on the 25th of February with various victims of Hungarian police brutality, during two separate crossing attempts on consecutive nights. They were interviewed and recorded on video by a journalist we have been collaborating with, Jaime Alekos, with the support of a translator who wishes to remain anonymous.

Interviewee: 14 years old from Afghanistan [crossed into Hungary the night of 22 February, 2017]

24:01 – When did you leave Afghanistan and why?
24:05 – I fled Afghanistan one year and two months ago. I fled Afghanistan because our life was not good there. I came here thinking that I’d have a good life and then I could go back.

24:27 – How long have you been in Serbia?
24:29 – For about four months.

24:38 – So did it take you one year to come from Afghanistan to Serbia?
24:43 – Yes, it took me one year, I had to spend 6 months in Bulgaria. Continue reading ““You can’t call this a life. We are humans, not donkeys.””

“They grabbed him and smashed his head against the ground breaking his teeth”

Photo: Laszlo Toroczkai

About one week ago I crossed the Hungarian border near Bački. It was very cold that night but it wasn’t snowing. We went before the snow started. I was in a group of 42–45 people. There were three or four minors amongst us and five to ten elderly people. It was after midnight when the fence got cut and we got through. We were still in the first jungle when we looked back and saw a police car about one kilometer behind us, right in the spot where the fence had been cut. The police saw that. We carried on walking for about one hour, then we saw a main road in front of us. There was a lot of houses alongside it and people living there put their lights on to see who is passing by. Continue reading ““They grabbed him and smashed his head against the ground breaking his teeth””

“They beat him so badly that there was blood coming out of his ears”

Photo: Laszlo Toroczkai

I crossed the Hungarian border near the Kelebija crossing around the 15th of January, we were thirty people. After we got through the fence we walked forward a little bit, maybe half a kilometer. They caught us and they brought us back to the border near Horgoš. We were transported in a green car. Three of them were wearing full army uniforms, the rest were around ten police officers in blue uniforms, not many badges on them. There was some kind of marking on the uniforms but I wasn’t allowed to look up, so I didn’t see them. At the end there were four or five police cars, two or three small ones and the rest was big vans. They were white with some markings on them, like regular police cars. There was one dark van. I’m not sure if it was black or blue, it was very dark. Continue reading ““They beat him so badly that there was blood coming out of his ears””